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NPR's afternoon radio newsmagazine, All things Considered presents two hours of breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special - sometimes quirky - features. A one-hour edition of the program is available on Saturday and Sunday.

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In 1981, Charles Fuller's A Soldier's Play premiered in New York City, featuring actors who would go on to become household names, like Samuel L. Jackson and Denzel Washington. The following year, Fuller became the second African American in history to win the Pulitzer Prize for Drama. But, at the time, the play did not transfer to Broadway. Fuller, who is now 80, wasn't surprised.

"I never thought it would be on Broadway," he says from his home in Toronto.

DJ and producer Andrew Weatherall, a titan of underground dance music, died Monday in London at age 56. The cause of death was a pulmonary embolism, according to a statement released by his management.

Weatherall started producing in London in the mid-'80s, and was known for a wicked sense of humor — and for blending an eclectic mix of genres.

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It's been warmer than normal in the Alps. There's less snowfall, even some rain. And all of that is making skiing at lower-altitude resorts difficult. NPR's Eleanor Beardsley sends this report from this French ski town of Morzine.

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Charles Fuller's "A Soldier's Play" is finally on Broadway. It premiered almost 40 years ago to great acclaim and a Pulitzer Prize. But its setting - a segregated Army base after World War II - and its subjects - racism and murder - may have been too much for Broadway back then. Alexandra Starr reports on what has and hasn't changed since the play's first run.

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